Brett Favre: ‘I’d never say never’ to Packers return

King is a big, physical corner. He’s helped himself throughout the draft process. He answered questions about his speed at the NFL Scouting Combine, where he had a phenomenal field workout. I think he rose from mid-second round to the middle portion of the first round.

The Packers need a big back to replace Eddie Lacy. Foreman’s running style is very similar Lacy’s. He’s a big, physical, rugged player. Foreman can be the power back with Ty Montgomery serving as his complement.

This is a move that simply makes sense. For a group of players who have been in the same system for years, it’s far more valuable for McCarthy to use the time to maximize his reps with the younger crowd. Teaching time is already at a premium, and this gives the coaching staff a chance to get its hands on the future of the franchise.

For the veterans, including quarterback Aaron Rodgers, it’s also a much-deserved mental break. After playing deep into the postseason, there was little respite between offseason commitments, recovery training and cheap jerseys and offseason training activities. It’s hard to measure the boost that comes with a long weekend, but McCarthy is hoping it’s another step back toward the playoffs.

“People have talked about the broadcasting booth. I think I’d be pretty good at it, but you never know. I know Bart [Starr] went back [to Green Bay] and did it and it wasn’t as successful as everyone would have assumed. I’m not going to think I would be any different, but it is an intriguing option. What better place to do it? Yeah, it’s crossed my mind.”

Favre had the opportunity to elaborate on his comments while appearing on The Rich Eisen Show on Friday. Although he emphatically said “no” when asked if he wanted to be an NFL coach or GM, he immediately left open the possibility.

He insisted in public that this team was not like last year’s, the one that started 6-1 and then collapsed to finish 8-8, but he was looking for something beyond what showed up in the statistics, the better speed on defense, or Vic Beasley’s mounting sack total.

Those were promising signs for the future, but they hadn’t averted the disasters of the prior two weeks, the losses to Seattle and San Diego in closely contested games that Atlanta had led late. There had been late interceptions in each of them, but those could be explained away by a quarterback pressing to make a play to save his team — his sometimes undisciplined team that got mind-numbing penalties at the worst moments, that could not stop an opposing offense.

Matt Barkley continues to earn money. In his fourth start, Barkley threw darts through the cold weather, making several pinpoint passes early and great reads down the field late. As it has been in his previous two losses, close wasn’t good enough for Barkley. The quarterback marched the Bears on a potential game-winning drive. A holding penalty backed the Bears up on first-and-goal, and a third down pass was knocked down in the end zone. The Bears settled for a chip-shot field goal to tie the game, but gave Rodgers too much time to drive for the win.

Barkley (30 for 43, 362 yards, two touchdowns, three interceptions) deserves praise for making throws in tight windows as the Bears stormed back from a 17-point deficit. Barkley’s turnovers put Chicago in that hole to begin with. After a stellar first half, Barkley committed turnovers on the first three possessions of the third quarter. Julius Peppers had a strip sack, followed by back-to-back Ha Ha Clinton-Dix interceptions, including one on a pass Barkley sailed high over the middle. Barkley earned himself years of NFL contracts with heady play. His turnover spree, however, displays why he’s not considered a franchise cornerstone.

The new version of the “triplets” brought the Cowboys back into the game just as the Packers were threatening to run away and hide with a 28-13 lead late in the third quarter. While social media was clamoring for a Tony Romo appearance, rookie quarterback Dak Prescott hit 13 of 17 throws for 142 yards, two touchdowns and a two-point conversion in his final three possessions. Directing a textbook one-minute drill, he picked up 42 yards in six plays to give Bailey an opportunity for the game-tying field goal.

Fellow rookie Ezekiel Elliott churned out 125 yards on 22 carries, highlighted by a phenomenal spin move on Clay Matthews to set up Dez Bryant’s seven-yard touchdown that ultimately tied the contest at 28 with five minutes remaining.